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34 search results for: drug interaction cbd

1

Potential Adverse Drug Events and Drug-Drug Interactions with Medical and Consumer Cannabidiol (CBD) Use.

Authors: Joshua D. Brown, Almut G. Winterstein
Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8 July 2019

Cannabidiol (CBD) is ubiquitous in state-based medical cannabis programs and consumer products for complementary health or recreational use. CBD has intrinsic pharmacologic effects and associated adverse drug events (ADEs) along with the potential for pharmacokinetic and pharm…

2

An Overview of Cannabidiol as a Multifunctional Drug: Pharmacokinetics and Cellular Effects

Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive compound derived from Cannabis Sativa, has garnered increasing attention for its diverse therapeutic potential. This comprehensive review delves into the complex pharmacokinetics of CBD, including factors such as bioavailability, distribution, safety profile, and dosage recommendations, which contribute to the compound’s pharmacological profile. CBD’s role as a pharmacological inhibitor is explored, encompassing interactions with the endocannabinoid system and ion channels. The compound’s anti-inflammatory effects, influencing the Interferon-beta and NF-κB, position it as a versatile candidate for immune system regulation and interventions in inflammatory processes. The historical context of Cannabis Sativa’s use for recreational and medicinal purposes adds depth to the discussion, emphasizing CBD’s emergence as a pivotal phytocannabinoid. As research continues, CBD’s integration into clinical practice holds promise for revolutionizing treatment approaches and enhancing patient outcomes. The evolution in CBD research encourages ongoing exploration, offering the prospect of unlocking new therapeutic utility.

3

Drug Interactions of Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol in Cannabinoid Drugs: Recommendations for Clinical Practice

Cannabinoid drugs containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or its structural analogues, as monotherapeutic agents or as extracts or botanical preparations with or without cannabidiol (CBD) are often prescribed to multimorbid patients who are taking multiple drugs. This raises the question of the risk of drug interactions. This review of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of interactions with cannabinoid drugs and their potential effects is based on pertinent publications retrieved by a selective literature search.

4

Highly purified cannabidiol in the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsies: A real-life impact on seizure frequency, quality of life, behavior, and sleep patterns from a single Italian center

Seizure frequency in treatment-resistant epilepsies seems to be decreased by cannabidiol (CBD), but contrasting data are available on its effect on sleep, behavior, and quality of life (QoL), and no data is reported on its effect on parental stress in patients with epilepsy (PWE). Thus, we conducted a retrospective study on a cohort of children and adults with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) who had been treated with highly purified, pharmaceutical-grade CBD to evaluate its effects on seizure frequency, QoL, behavior, parental stress, and sleep. Eighteen patients (12 adults and 6 children) were included in the cohort and followed for a median of 9 months.

5

Inhibition of Nicotine Metabolism by Cannabidiol (CBD) and 7-Hydroxycannabidiol (7-OH-CBD)

Cannabis-based products have experienced notable increases in co-usage alongside tobacco products. Several cannabinoids exhibit inhibition of a number of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes, but few studies have examined their inhibition of enzymes involved in nicotine metabolism. The goal of the present study was to examine potential drug–drug interactions occurring in the nicotine metabolism pathway perpetrated by cannabidiol (CBD) and its active metabolite, 7-hydroxy-CBD (7-OH-CBD). The inhibitory effects of CBD and 7-OH-CBD were tested in microsomes from HEK293 cells overexpressing individual metabolizing enzymes and from human liver tissue. Assays with overexpressing microsomes demonstrated that CBD and 7-OH-CBD inhibited CYP-mediated nicotine metabolism.

7

Serious adverse effects of cannabidiol (CBD): a review of randomized controlled trials.

Authors: Rafael G. dos Santos, Francisco S. Guimarães, José Alexandre S. Crippa, et al
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology, 9 April 2020

Introduction: Recent trials using cannabidiol (CBD) have shown that most acute and prolonged adverse effects of CBD are mild to moderate, with rare serious adverse effects (SAEs). This review focused on analyzing SAEs of CBD and their possible relation to drug-drug interaction…

8

Drug-drug interaction between clobazam and cannabidiol in children with refractory epilepsy.

Authors: Alexandra L. Geffrey, Sarah F. Pollack, Patricia L. Bruno, Elizabeth A. Thiele
Epilepsia, August 2015

OBJECTIVE: Under an expanded access investigational new drug (IND) trial, cannabidiol (CBD) is being studied as a possible adjuvant treatment of refractory epilepsy in children. Of the 25 subjects in the trial, 13 were being treated with clobazam (CLB). Because CLB and CBD are…

9

Cannabidiol: from an inactive cannabinoid to a drug with wide spectrum of action.

Authors: Antonio Waldo Zuardi
Brazilian Journal of Psychiatry, September 2008

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to describe the historical development of research on cannabidiol. METHOD: This review was carried out on reports drawn from Medline, Web of Science and SciELO. DISCUSSION: After the elucidation of the chemical structure of cannabidiol in 1…

10

Global Cannabis Clinician Program

Cannabinoid Therapeutics for the modern Global Clinician – 8 CEUs $300.00 CBD and Cannabis Therapeutics are now available to populations around the globe. It is critically important that clinicians familiarize…

11

Cannabis for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: What is the patients’ view?

Cannabis may have therapeutic benefits to relieve symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) thanks to its pleiotropic pharmacological activity. This study is the first to present a large questionnaire-based survey about the “real-life” situation regarding cannabis use in the medical context in ALS patients in France. There were 129 respondents and 28 reported the use of cannabis (21.7%) to relieve symptoms of ALS. Participants mostly reported the use of cannabidiol (CBD) oil and cannabis weed and declared benefits both on motor (rigidity, cramps, fasciculations) and non-motor (sleep quality, pain, emotional state, quality of life, depression) symptoms and only eight reported minor adverse reactions (drowsiness, euphoria and dry mouth). Even if cannabis is mostly used outside medical pathways and could expose patients to complications (street and uncontrolled drugs, drug-drug interactions, adverse effects…), most of the participants reported “rational” consumption (legal cannabinoids, with only few combustion and adverse reactions). Despite some limitations, this study highlights the need for further research on the potential benefits of cannabis use for the management of ALS motor and non-motor symptoms. Indeed, there is an urgent need and call for and from patients to know more about cannabis and secure its use in a medical context.

12

Adverse Effects of Oral Cannabidiol: An Updated Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials (2020–2022)

Abnormal energy metabolism, as one of the important hallmarks of cancer, was induced by multiple carcinogenic factors and tumor-specific microenvironments. It comprises aerobic glycolysis, de novo lipid biosynthesis, and glutamine-dependent anaplerosis. Considering that metabolic reprogramming provides various nutrients for tumor survival and development, it has been considered a potential target for cancer therapy. Cannabinoids have been shown to exhibit a variety of anticancer activities by unclear mechanisms. This paper first reviews the recent progress of related signaling pathways (reactive oxygen species (ROS), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α), and p53) mediating the reprogramming of cancer metabolism (including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism). Then we comprehensively explore the latest discoveries and possible mechanisms of the anticancer effects of cannabinoids through the regulation of the above-mentioned related signaling pathways, to provide new targets and insights for cancer prevention and treatment.