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Perceived Efficacy, Reduced Prescription Drug Use, and Minimal Side Effects of Cannabis in Patients with Chronic Orthopedic Pain

The most important discoveries in pharmacology, such as certain classes of analgesics or chemotherapeutics, started from natural extracts which have been found to have effects in traditional medicine. Cannabis, traditionally used in Asia for the treatment of pain, nausea, spasms, sleep, depression, and low appetite, is still a good candidate for the development of new compounds. If initially all attention was directed to the endocannabinoid system, recent studies suggest that many of the clinically proven effects are based on an intrinsic chain of mechanisms that do not necessarily involve only cannabinoid receptors.

Analgesic Potential of Terpenes Derived from Cannabis sativa

Decades of research have improved our knowledge of cannabis polypharmacy and contributing phytochemicals, including terpenes. Reform of the legal status for cannabis possession and increased availability (medicinal and recreational) have resulted in cannabis use to combat the increasing prevalence of pain and may help to address the opioid crisis. Better understanding of the pharmacological effects of cannabis and its active components, including terpenes, may assist in identifying new therapeutic approaches and optimizing the use of cannabis and/or terpenes as analgesic agents.

Prolonged Medical Cannabis Treatment is Associated With Quality of Life Improvement and Reduction of Analgesic Medication Consumption in Chronic Pain Patients

Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is one of the most prevalent indications for medical cannabis (MC) treatment globally. In this study, we investigated CNCP parameters in patients during prolonged MC treatment, and assessed the interrelation between CNCP parameters and the chemical composition of MC chemovar used.

Mini-Review Cannabis in palliative care: current challenges and practical recommendations

Pain and symptom control challenges are common in palliative care, and the search for other therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Unfortunately, patients and their caregivers are receiving little information or support from healthcare providers regarding the increasingly popular cannabinoid-based medicines (CBM). Clinicians, meanwhile, feel understandably perplexed by the discrepancy between the available evidence and the rapid interest in which patients and their families have demonstrated for CBM. There is an urgent need to address the many challenges that are delaying the appropriate integration of CBM into clinical practice, notwithstanding the obvious need for a solid general knowledge of pharmacology, mechanism of action and available clinical evidence supporting its use

Treatment of Chronic Pruritus With Medical Marijuana

Chronic pruritus is a debilitating symptom that is associated with numerous dermatologic, neurologic, and systemic diseases. It is often resistant to treatment and can cause a severe reduction in quality of life.1 Currently, to our knowledge, there is a lack of US Food and Drug Administration–approved therapies for pruritus, so treatment can be difficult and relies on off-label therapeutics. In this article, we report a case of successful use of medical marijuana for treating chronic pruritus.

Cannabis Significantly Reduces the Use of Prescription Opioids and Improves Quality of Life in Authorized Patients: Results of a Large Prospective Study

Authors Philippe Lucas, MA PhD, Susan Boyd, PhD, M -J Milloy, PhD, Zach Walsh, PhD Published in Pain Medicine December 2020 Abstract Objective This article presents findings from a large prospective examination of Canadian medical cannabis patients, with a focus on the impacts of cannabis on prescription opioid use and quality of life over a…

Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia

Author: George Habib, Suheil Artul Published in Journal of Clinical Rheumatology August 2018 Abstract Background Background: Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and mood disturbances. There are nearly no data on the effect of medical cannabis (MC) treatment on patients with fibromyalgia. Methods Data were obtained from the registries of…

Medical Cannabis in Asthmatic Patients.

Authors: Amir Jarjou’i, Gabriel Izbicki
The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ, April 2020

BACKGROUND: With the increased use of cannabis in the medicinal and recreational domains, it is becoming more important for physicians to better understand its harmful and beneficial effects. Although medical cannabis comes in several forms, the preferred route of administrati…

Safety and Efficacy of Medical Cannabis in Fibromyalgia.

Authors: Iftach Sagy, Lihi Bar-Lev Schleider, Mahmoud Abu-Shakra, Victor Novack
Journal of Clinical Medicine, 5 June 2019

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain may be treated by medical cannabis. Yet, there is scarce evidence to support the role of medical cannabis in the treatment of fibromyalgia. The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics, safety, and effectiveness of medical cannabis thera…

A double-blind randomized placebo controlled study assessing safety, tolerability and efficacy of palmitoylethanolamide for symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

Authors: Elizabeth Steels, Ruchitha Venkatesh, Eleanor Steels, Gemma Vitetta, Luis Vitetta
Inflammopharmacology, June 2019

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to assess the safety, tolerability and efficacy of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) when dosed at 300 mg and 600 mg per day on symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: This was a single site, comparative, double-blind placebo controlled study i…

Endocannabinoids, exercise, pain, and a path to health with aging.

Authors: Bruce A.Watkins
Molecular Aspects of Medicine, December 2018

Physical activity is an important lifestyle factor for growth, development, and sustained health throughout life. In recent years, the benefits of physical activity have drawn more attention to its physiological effects on the body, including well-being. The endocannabinoid sy…

Cannabis in palliative medicine: improving care and reducing opioid-related morbidity.

Authors: Gregory T. Carter, Aaron M. Flanagan, Mitchell Earleywine, Donald I. Abrams, et al
American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, August 2011

Unlike hospice, long-term drug safety is an important issue in palliative medicine. Opioids may produce significant morbidity. Cannabis is a safer alternative with broad applicability for palliative care. Yet the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) classifies cannabis as Schedule I…