Posts

Topical cannabidiol (CBD) in skin pathology – A comprehensive review and prospects for new therapeutic opportunities

Humans have utilised cannabis products in various forms throughout the recorded history. To date, more than 500 biologically active components have been identified in the plants of the Cannabis genus, amongst which more than 100 were classified as phytocannabinoids (exocannabinoids). The plant genus Cannabis is a member of the plant family Cannabaceae, and there are three primary cannabis species which vary in their biochemical constituents: Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica and Cannabis ruderalis. There has been a growing level of interest in research on the topical usage of a cannabis-based extract as a safer and more effective alternative to the usage of topical corticosteroids in treating some dermatoses. Together with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors on the skin, it has been further illustrated that topical cannabis has anti-inflammatory, anti-itching, analgesics, wound healing and anti-proliferative effects on the skin.

Medical cannabis and automobile accidents: Evidence from auto insurance

While many states have legalized medical cannabis, many unintended consequences remain under-studied. We focus on one potential detriment-the effect of cannabis legalization on automobile safety. We examine this relationship through auto insurance premiums. Employing a modern difference-in-differences framework and zip code-level premium data from 2014 to 2019, we find that premiums declined, on average, by $22 per year following medical cannabis legalization. The effect is more substantial in areas near a dispensary and in areas with a higher prevalence of drunk driving before legalization. We estimate that existing legalization has reduced health expenditures related to auto accidents by almost $820 million per year with the potential for a further $350 million reduction if legalized nationally.

The Endocannabinoid System: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Coagulopathies

The legal status of Cannabis is changing, fueling an increasing diversity of Cannabis-derived products. Because Cannabis contains dozens of chemical compounds with potential psychoactive or medicinal effects, understanding this phytochemical diversity is crucial. The legal Cannabis industry heavily markets products to consumers based on widely used labeling systems purported to predict the effects of different “strains.” We analyzed the cannabinoid and terpene content of commercial Cannabis samples across six US states, finding distinct chemical phenotypes (chemotypes) which are reliably present. By comparing the observed phytochemical diversity to the commercial labels commonly attached to Cannabis-derived product samples, we show that commercial labels do not consistently align with the observed chemical diversity.

The phytochemical diversity of commercial Cannabis in the United States

The legal status of Cannabis is changing, fueling an increasing diversity of Cannabis-derived products. Because Cannabis contains dozens of chemical compounds with potential psychoactive or medicinal effects, understanding this phytochemical diversity is crucial. The legal Cannabis industry heavily markets products to consumers based on widely used labeling systems purported to predict the effects of different “strains.” We analyzed the cannabinoid and terpene content of commercial Cannabis samples across six US states, finding distinct chemical phenotypes (chemotypes) which are reliably present. By comparing the observed phytochemical diversity to the commercial labels commonly attached to Cannabis-derived product samples, we show that commercial labels do not consistently align with the observed chemical diversity. However, certain labels do show a biased association with specific chemotypes. These results have implications for the classification of commercial Cannabis, design of animal and human research, and regulation of consumer marketing—areas which today are often divorced from the chemical reality of the Cannabis-derived material they wish to represent.

Cannabis for Medical Use: Versatile Plant Rather Than a Single Drug

Here, we discuss how phytocannabinoid profiles differ between plants depending on the chemovar types, review the major factors that affect secondary metabolite accumulation in the plant including the genotype, growth conditions, processing, storage and the delivery route; and highlight how these factors make Cannabis treatment highly complex.

Characteristics of adults with a medical cannabis license, reasons for use, and perceptions of benefit following medical cannabis legalization in Oklahoma

Little is known about the risks and benefits associated with medical cannabis legalization. The current study was an online panel survey of adult Oklahomans recruited between September and October.

Routes of administration, reasons for use, and approved indications of medical cannabis in oncology: a scoping review

Some patients diagnosed with cancer use medical cannabis to self-manage undesirable symptoms, including nausea and pain. To improve patient safety and oncological care quality, the routes of administration for use of medical cannabis, patients’ reasons, and prescribed indications must be better understood.

Cannabis Biomolecule Effects on Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem Cells: Cytotoxic, Anti-Proliferative, and Anti-Migratory Activities

Cancer is a complex family of diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Gliomas are primary brain tumors that account for ~80% of all malignant brain tumors. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, invasive, and lethal subtype of glioma. Therapy resistance and intra-GBM tumoral heterogeneity are promoted by subpopulations of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Cannabis sativa produces hundreds of secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, terpenes, and phytocannabinoids. Around 160 phytocannabinoids have been identified in C. sativa. Cannabis is commonly used to treat various medical conditions, and it is used in the palliative care of cancer patients. The anti-cancer properties of cannabis compounds include cytotoxic, anti-proliferative, and anti-migratory activities on cancer cells and cancer stem cells. The endocannabinoids system is widely distributed in the body, and its dysregulation is associated with different diseases, including various types of cancer. Anti-cancer activities of phytocannabinoids are mediated in glioma cells, at least partially, by the endocannabinoid receptors, triggering various cellular signaling pathways, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. Specific combinations of multiple phytocannabinoids act synergistically against cancer cells and may trigger different anti-cancer signaling pathways. Yet, due to scarcity of clinical trials, there remains no solid basis for the anti-cancer therapeutic potential of cannabis compounds.

Effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol on aversive memories and anxiety: a review from human studies

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may stem from the formation of aberrant and enduring aversive memories. Some PTSD patients have recreationally used Cannabis, probably aiming at relieving their symptomatology. However, it is still largely unknown whether and how Cannabis or its psychotomimetic compound Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) attenuates the aversive/traumatic memory outcomes. Here, we seek to review and discuss the effects of THC on aversive memory extinction and anxiety in healthy humans and PTSD patients.

The therapeutic role of Cannabidiol in mental health: a systematic review

The therapeutic application of cannabidiol (CBD) is gaining interest due to expanding evidence for its use.
Objective: To summarize the clinical outcomes, study designs and limitations for the use of CBD and nabiximols (whole plant extract from Cannabis sativa L. that has been purified into 1:1 ratio of CBD and delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol) in the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

Cannabidiol (CBD) in Cancer Management

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the main constituents of the plant Cannabis sativa.
Surveys suggest that medicinal cannabis is popular amongst people diagnosed with cancer. CBD
is one of the key constituents of cannabis, and does not have the potentially intoxicating effects
that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the other key phytocannabinoid has. Research indicates the CBD
may have potential for the treatment of cancer, including the symptoms and signs associated with
cancer and its treatment. Preclinical research suggests CBD may address many of the pathways
involved in the pathogenesis of cancers. Preclinical and clinical research also suggests some evidence
of efficacy, alone or in some cases in conjunction with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the other key
phytocannabinoid in cannabis), in treating cancer-associated pain, anxiety and depression, sleep
problems, nausea and vomiting, and oral mucositis that are associated with cancer and/or its
treatment. Studies also suggest that CBD may enhance orthodox treatments with chemotherapeutic
agents and radiation therapy and protect against neural and organ damage. CBD shows promise as
part of an integrative approach to the management of cancer.

Cannabis for the Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Report of 3 Cases

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurobehavioral disorder that is highly prevalent in children and adults. An increasing number of patients with ADHD are self-medicating with cannabis, despite a lack of evidence on efficacy and safety. This case report describes 3 males (ages 18, 22, and 23) who have integrated cannabis into their treatment regimen with positive results. Semistructured interviews conducted with the patients describe subjective improvements in symptoms and on quality of life.

Events

CSequence & The Society of Cannabis Clinicians Presents Journal Club: Cannabis vs. Opioids For Back Pain- Two New Studies

Friday, July 1, 2022 Event Description Join us for the upcoming SCC Journal Club featuring Dr. Dustin Sulak as he shares his presentation on “Cannabis vs. Opioids For Back Pain: Two New Studies!” If you are not an SCC member, please click “Sign Up” at the top of the page in order to Register. The…

The SCC Quarterly Meeting: Acidic Cannabinoids: Inactive Precursors or Powerful Therapeutics

Friday, June 24, 2022 Event Description Join us for the upcoming SCC Quarterly Meeting featuring Dr. Dustin Sulak as he shares his presentation on “Acidic Cannabinoids: Inactive Precursors or Powerful Therapeutics!” If you are not an SCC member, please click “Sign Up” at the top of the page in order to Register. The event is…