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Perceived Efficacy, Reduced Prescription Drug Use, and Minimal Side Effects of Cannabis in Patients with Chronic Orthopedic Pain

The most important discoveries in pharmacology, such as certain classes of analgesics or chemotherapeutics, started from natural extracts which have been found to have effects in traditional medicine. Cannabis, traditionally used in Asia for the treatment of pain, nausea, spasms, sleep, depression, and low appetite, is still a good candidate for the development of new compounds. If initially all attention was directed to the endocannabinoid system, recent studies suggest that many of the clinically proven effects are based on an intrinsic chain of mechanisms that do not necessarily involve only cannabinoid receptors.

Analgesic Potential of Terpenes Derived from Cannabis sativa

Decades of research have improved our knowledge of cannabis polypharmacy and contributing phytochemicals, including terpenes. Reform of the legal status for cannabis possession and increased availability (medicinal and recreational) have resulted in cannabis use to combat the increasing prevalence of pain and may help to address the opioid crisis. Better understanding of the pharmacological effects of cannabis and its active components, including terpenes, may assist in identifying new therapeutic approaches and optimizing the use of cannabis and/or terpenes as analgesic agents.

Practical Strategies Using Medical Cannabis to Reduce Harms Associated With Long Term Opioid Use in Chronic Pain

Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is estimated to affect 20% of the adult population. Current United States and Canadian Chronic non-cancer pain guidelines recommend careful reassessment of the risk-benefit ratio for doses greater than 90 mg morphine equivalent dose (MED), due to low evidence for improved pain efficacy at higher morphine equivalent dose and a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. There are a number of human studies demonstrating cannabis opioid synergy. This preliminary evidence suggests a potential role of cannabis as an adjunctive therapy with or without opioids to optimize pain control.

To describe the prevalence and patterns of cannabidiol (CBD) use in women with co-existing chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and fibromyalgia, and to evaluate characteristics associated with pain improvement.
To describe the prevalence and patterns of cannabidiol (CBD) use in women with co-existing chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and fibromyalgia, and to evaluate characteristics associated with pain improvement.

To describe the prevalence and patterns of cannabidiol (CBD) use in women with co-existing chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and fibromyalgia, and to evaluate characteristics associated with pain improvement.

Many cannabinoids display promising non-hallucinogenic bioactivities that are determined by the variable nature of the side chain and prenyl group defined by the enzymes involved in their synthesis.

Use of Cannabis for Self-Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain

SCC member Kenzi Riboulet-Zemouli identifies a coherent nomenclature for cannabis products (whether derived from Cannabis sativa L. or not). The paper was published in Drug Science, Policy and Law in December of 2020.

Experience of Migraine, its Severity, and Perceived Efficacy of Treatments among Cannabis Users

A study from Complementary Therapies in Medicine in 2020 examines patterns of cannabis use and its associated relief among migraineurs.

Understanding Cannabis-Based Therapeutics in Sports Medicine

SCC Member Gretchen E. Maurer, DO, MS and colleagues examine the current research potential for cannabis in sports medicine.

Cannabis and Cannabidiol (CBD) for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia

Authors: Amnon A.Berger MD, PhD, Joseph Keefe BM, Ariel Winnick MA, Elasaf Gilbert BS, Jonathan P.Eskander MD, MBA, Cyrus Yazdi MD, Alan D.Kaye MD, PhD, Omar Viswanath MD, Ivan Urits MD Published in Science Direct  August 2020 Abstract Background Fibromyalgia is a complex disease process that is as prevalent as it is poorly understood. Research into…

Cannabinergic pain medicine: a concise clinical primer and survey of randomized-controlled trial results.

Authors: Sunil Aggarwal
Clinical Journal of Pain, February 2013

OBJECTIVES: This article attempts to cover pragmatic clinical considerations involved in the use of cannabinergic medicines in pain practice, including geographical and historical considerations, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse effects, drug interactions, indicatio…