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Medical, therapeutic, and recreational use of cannabis among young men who have sex with men living with HIV

Cannabis plays a role in symptoms management in HIV, especially the alleviation of pain and nausea and stimulation of appetite, and prevalence of cannabis use in HIV-positive populations exceeds that of the general U.S. population. Previous research has described an “overlap” between medical and recreational cannabis use among persons living with HIV. To understand better the motives associated cannabis use among young men who have sex with men living with HIV (HIV+ YMSM), we conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 HIV+YMSM in Denver and Chicago.

Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome Survey and Genomic Investigation

Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is a diagnosis of exclusion with intractable nausea, cy- clic vomiting, abdominal pain, and hot bathing behavior associated with ongoing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure. Increasing cannabis use may elevate CHS prevalence, exacerbating a public health issue with atten- dant costs and morbidity.

Marijuana and Cannabinoids in ESRD and Earlier Stages of CKD

Authors: Joshua L. Rein, Christina M. Wyatt Published in American Journal of Kidney Diseases August 2017 Abstract Marijuana is the most commonly used recreational drug in the United States, and legal recreational and medicinal use has gained public acceptance during the last decade. Twenty-nine US states have established medical marijuana programs, 8 of which have also…

Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Review of Potential Mechanisms

Authors: Marieka V. DeVuono, Linda A. Parker Published in Mary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers June 2020 Abstract Introduction Cannabinoids have long been known for their ability to treat nausea and vomiting. Recent reports, however, have highlighted the paradoxical proemetic effects of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is characterized by cyclical episodes of nausea and vomiting, accompanied…

Use of cannabinoids in cancer patients: A Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) clinical practice statement.

Authors: B. Whitcomb, C. Lutman, M. Pearl, E. Medlin, E. Prendergast, K. Robison, W. Burke
Gynecologic Oncology, 10 January 2020

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) affect the human endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids reduce chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting (CINV) and neuropathic pain. Each state has its own regulations for medical and recreational cannabis use. Ef…

Should Oncologists Recommend Cannabis?

Authors: Donald I. Abrams
Current Treatment Options in Oncology, 3 June 2019

Cannabis is a useful botanical with a wide range of therapeutic potential. Global prohibition over the past century has impeded the ability to study the plant as medicine. However, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been developed as a stand-alone pharmaceutical initially …

Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: An unrecognized cause of nausea and vomiting.

Authors: Tiffany N. Smith, Anne Walsh, Christopher P. Forest
Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, April 2019

Cannabis has long been used for medical and recreational purposes because of its antiemetic, analgesic, and mood effects. Ironically, chronic use of cannabis can result in paradoxical effects, including a condition known as cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Patients with this …

Practical Perspectives in the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting.

Authors: David J. Cangemi, Braden Kuo
Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, March 2019

Nausea and vomiting result from complex interactions between afferent and efferent pathways of the gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system, and autonomic nervous system. Afferent pathways from the vagus nerve, vestibular system, and chemoreceptor trigger zone project to…

Patient Counseling Guidelines for the Use of Cannabis for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea/Vomiting and Chronic Pain.

Authors: Patrick Makary, Jayesh R. Parmar, Natalie Mims, Nile M. Khanfar, Robert A. Freeman
Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, December 2018

The use of cannabis medications has grown in recent years for the symptomatic relief of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chronic pain (cancer-related and non-cancer-related). As states legalize the use of cannabis, it is important for pharmacists and other healt…

Oral cannabinoid-rich THC/CBD cannabis extract for secondary prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a study protocol for a pilot and definitive randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial (CannabisCINV).

Authors: Antony J. Mersiades, Annette Tognela, Paul S. Haber, Martin Stockler, Nicholas Lintzeris, et al
BMJ open, 12 September 2018

INTRODUCTION: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an important issue for patients receiving chemotherapy despite guideline-consistent antiemetic therapy. Trials using delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-rich (THC) products demonstrate limited antiemetic effect, si…

Using Medical Cannabis in an Oncology Practice.

Authors: Donald I. Abrams
Oncology, May 2016

As oncologists, we treat patients who have devastating diagnoses with potent therapies. Hence, we demand solid evidence before recommending any intervention. Unfortunately, when it comes to supporting the use of cannabis in clinical situations, we are frustrated by a dearth of…

Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

Authors: D.I. Abrams
Current Oncology, March 2016

Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For t…