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Use of cannabinoids in cancer patients: A Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) clinical practice statement.

Authors: B. Whitcomb, C. Lutman, M. Pearl, E. Medlin, E. Prendergast, K. Robison, W. Burke
Gynecologic Oncology, 10 January 2020

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) affect the human endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids reduce chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting (CINV) and neuropathic pain. Each state has its own regulations for medical and recreational cannabis use. Ef…

Should Oncologists Recommend Cannabis?

Authors: Donald I. Abrams
Current Treatment Options in Oncology, 3 June 2019

Cannabis is a useful botanical with a wide range of therapeutic potential. Global prohibition over the past century has impeded the ability to study the plant as medicine. However, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been developed as a stand-alone pharmaceutical initially …

Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: An unrecognized cause of nausea and vomiting.

Authors: Tiffany N. Smith, Anne Walsh, Christopher P. Forest
Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, April 2019

Cannabis has long been used for medical and recreational purposes because of its antiemetic, analgesic, and mood effects. Ironically, chronic use of cannabis can result in paradoxical effects, including a condition known as cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Patients with this …

Practical Perspectives in the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting.

Authors: David J. Cangemi, Braden Kuo
Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, March 2019

Nausea and vomiting result from complex interactions between afferent and efferent pathways of the gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system, and autonomic nervous system. Afferent pathways from the vagus nerve, vestibular system, and chemoreceptor trigger zone project to…

Patient Counseling Guidelines for the Use of Cannabis for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea/Vomiting and Chronic Pain.

Authors: Patrick Makary, Jayesh R. Parmar, Natalie Mims, Nile M. Khanfar, Robert A. Freeman
Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, December 2018

The use of cannabis medications has grown in recent years for the symptomatic relief of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chronic pain (cancer-related and non-cancer-related). As states legalize the use of cannabis, it is important for pharmacists and other healt…

Oral cannabinoid-rich THC/CBD cannabis extract for secondary prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a study protocol for a pilot and definitive randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial (CannabisCINV).

Authors: Antony J. Mersiades, Annette Tognela, Paul S. Haber, Martin Stockler, Nicholas Lintzeris, et al
BMJ open, 12 September 2018

INTRODUCTION: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an important issue for patients receiving chemotherapy despite guideline-consistent antiemetic therapy. Trials using delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-rich (THC) products demonstrate limited antiemetic effect, si…

Using Medical Cannabis in an Oncology Practice.

Authors: Donald I. Abrams
Oncology, May 2016

As oncologists, we treat patients who have devastating diagnoses with potent therapies. Hence, we demand solid evidence before recommending any intervention. Unfortunately, when it comes to supporting the use of cannabis in clinical situations, we are frustrated by a dearth of…

Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

Authors: D.I. Abrams
Current Oncology, March 2016

Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For t…

Cannabinoids for Medical Use: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Authors: Penny F. Whiting, Robert F. Wolff, Sohan Deshpande, Marcello Di Nisio, Steven Duffy, et al
JAMA, 23 June 2015

IMPORTANCE: Cannabis and cannabinoid drugs are widely used to treat disease or alleviate symptoms, but their efficacy for specific indications is not clear. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the benefits and adverse events (AEs) of cannabinoids. DATA SOURCES: Twenty…

Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

Authors: Jonathan A. Galli, Ronald Andari Sawaya, Frank K. Friedenberg
Current Drug Abuse Reviews, December 2011

Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequen…

Cannabinoid hyperemesis: a case series.

Authors: Michael W. Donnino, Michael N. Cocchi, Joseph Miller, Jonathan Fisher
The Journal of Emergency Medicine, April 2011

BACKGROUND: Cannabinoid use is prevalent in the United States, with recent reports of increased usage among younger Americans. Traditionally, cannabinoids have been used recreationally or as antiemetics; however, recent reports suggest that chronic abuse can result in the para…

Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: clinical diagnosis of an underrecognised manifestation of chronic cannabis abuse.

Authors: Siva P. Sontineni, Sanjay Chaudhary, Vijaya Sontineni, Stephen J. Lanspa
World Journal of Gastroenterology, 14 March 2009

Cannabis is a common drug of abuse that is associated with various long-term and short-term adverse effects. The nature of its association with vomiting after chronic abuse is obscure and is underrecognised by clinicians. In some patients this vomiting can take on a pattern si…