Posts

Increased White Matter Coherence Following Three and Six Months of Medical Cannabis Treatment

Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal white matter (WM) microstructure in recreational cannabis consumers; however, the long-term impact of medical cannabis (MC) use on WM coherence is unknown. Accordingly, this study assessed the longitudinal impact of MC treatment on WM coherence. Given results from preclinical studies, we hypothesized that MC treatment would be associated with increased fractional anisotropy (FA) and reduced mean diffusivity (MD).

Increased White Matter Coherence Following Three and Six Months of Medical Cannabis Treatment

Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal white matter (WM) microstructure in recreational cannabis consumers; however, the long-term impact of medical cannabis (MC) use on WM coherence is unknown. Accordingly, this study assessed the longitudinal impact of MC treatment on WM coherence. Given results from preclinical studies, we hypothesized that MC treatment would be associated with increased frac- tional anisotropy (FA) and reduced mean diffusivity (MD).

Healthcare provider and medical cannabis patient communication regarding referral and medication substitution: the Canadian context

Patients use medical cannabis for a wide array of illnesses and symptoms, and many substitute canna- bis for pharmaceuticals. This substitution often occurs without physician oversight, raising patient safety concerns. We aimed to characterize substitution and doctor-patient communication patterns in Canada, where there is a mature market and national regulatory system for medical cannabis.
Methods: We conducted an anonymous, cross-se

Characteristics of adults with a medical cannabis license, reasons for use, and perceptions of benefit following medical cannabis legalization in Oklahoma

Little is known about the risks and benefits associated with medical cannabis legalization. The current study was an online panel survey of adult Oklahomans recruited between September and October.

Medical marijuana knowledge and attitudes amongst internal medicine residents

Mounting evidence suggests the safety and efficacy of medical marijuana (MM) in treating chronic ailments, including chronic pain, epilepsy, and anorexia. Despite incremental use of medical and recreational cannabinoids, current limited evidence shows generalized unpreparedness of medical providers to discuss or recommend these substances to their patients. Herein, the present study aims to examine internal medicine residents’ knowledge of marijuana and their attitude towards its medical use.

Routes of administration, reasons for use, and approved indications of medical cannabis in oncology: a scoping review

Some patients diagnosed with cancer use medical cannabis to self-manage undesirable symptoms, including nausea and pain. To improve patient safety and oncological care quality, the routes of administration for use of medical cannabis, patients’ reasons, and prescribed indications must be better understood.

Perceived Efficacy, Reduced Prescription Drug Use, and Minimal Side Effects of Cannabis in Patients with Chronic Orthopedic Pain

The most important discoveries in pharmacology, such as certain classes of analgesics or chemotherapeutics, started from natural extracts which have been found to have effects in traditional medicine. Cannabis, traditionally used in Asia for the treatment of pain, nausea, spasms, sleep, depression, and low appetite, is still a good candidate for the development of new compounds. If initially all attention was directed to the endocannabinoid system, recent studies suggest that many of the clinically proven effects are based on an intrinsic chain of mechanisms that do not necessarily involve only cannabinoid receptors.

Survey of Patients Employing Cannabigerol-Predominant Cannabis Preparations: Perceived Medical Effects, Adverse Events, and Withdrawal Symptoms

Cannabigerol (CBG), and its precursor before decarboxylation, cannabigerolic acid is sometimes labeled the “mother of all cannabinoids.” The purpose of the present study was to investigate reasons for use and self-reported therapeutic effects in CBG-predominant cannabis users. Usage patterns and adverse effects, including withdrawal symptoms were also explored.

The Effect of Medical Cannabis on Pain Level and Quality of Sleep among Rheumatology Clinic Outpatients

Medical cannabis (MC) is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of chronic pain conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of MC treatment on pain level and quality of sleep of patients with different medical conditions at the rheumatology clinic.

Practical Strategies Using Medical Cannabis to Reduce Harms Associated With Long Term Opioid Use in Chronic Pain

Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is estimated to affect 20% of the adult population. Current United States and Canadian Chronic non-cancer pain guidelines recommend careful reassessment of the risk-benefit ratio for doses greater than 90 mg morphine equivalent dose (MED), due to low evidence for improved pain efficacy at higher morphine equivalent dose and a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. There are a number of human studies demonstrating cannabis opioid synergy. This preliminary evidence suggests a potential role of cannabis as an adjunctive therapy with or without opioids to optimize pain control.

To describe the prevalence and patterns of cannabidiol (CBD) use in women with co-existing chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and fibromyalgia, and to evaluate characteristics associated with pain improvement.
To describe the prevalence and patterns of cannabidiol (CBD) use in women with co-existing chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and fibromyalgia, and to evaluate characteristics associated with pain improvement.

To describe the prevalence and patterns of cannabidiol (CBD) use in women with co-existing chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and fibromyalgia, and to evaluate characteristics associated with pain improvement.

Many cannabinoids display promising non-hallucinogenic bioactivities that are determined by the variable nature of the side chain and prenyl group defined by the enzymes involved in their synthesis.

Opposite Roles for Cannabidiol and δ-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Psychotomimetic Effects of Cannabis Extracts: A Naturalistic Controlled Study

Although δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main cannabinoid from the cannabis plant, is responsible for the psychotomimetic effects of cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), the second most abundant cannabinoid in the cannabis plant, does not show any psychotomimetic effect. Cannabidiol has even been proposed to be antipsychotic and to counteract some of the psychotomimetic effects of THC. The aim of this study was to test the potential antipsychotomimetic effects of CBD.

Preferences for Medical Marijuana over Prescription Medications Among Persons Living with Chronic Conditions: Alternative, Complementary, and Tapering Uses

Despite expanded legalization and utilization of medical cannabis (MC) internationally, there is a lack of patient-centered data on how MC is used by persons living with chronic conditions in tandem with or instead of prescription medications. This study describes approaches to use of MC vis-à-vis prescription medications in the treatment of selected chronic conditions.

Events

SCC & CSequence Presents Journal Club: “Cannabis Consumption Used by Cancer Patients during Immunotherapy Correlates with Poor Clinical Outcome!”

Friday, May 6, 2022 at 9am PDT / 12pm EDT Research Presentation: SCC & CSequence Presents Journal Club: “Cannabis Consumption Used by Cancer Patients during Immunotherapy Correlates with Poor Clinical Outcome!”…

SCC Quarterly Meeting: Dr. Lauren Streicher, “The Use of Cannabinoids in Menopause”

Event Description Join us for the upcoming SCC Quarterly Meeting featuring Dr. Lauren Streicher as she shares her presentation on “The Use of Cannabinoids in Menopause.” If you are not…