Used to classify article posts by terms used for medical conditions. It’s mostly aimed at practitioners and physicians.

Cannabis and Driving in Older Adults

Question: What is the association between retail cannabis available to the consumer, driving, and associated blood tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels in people over 65 years of age? Findings: In this cohort study, 31 regular users of cannabis aged 65 to 79 years chose on average high potency (18.74% THC) THC-dominant cannabis. Weaving was increased and speed was decreased at 30 minutes after smoking, which was not correlated with blood THC concentrations; subjective experience and self-reports of impaired driving persisted for 3 hours. Meaning: These findings suggest that older drivers, even if they regularly use cannabis, show evidence of impaired driving performance after smoking cannabis.

Cannabidiol for behavior symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (CANBiS-AD): a random- ized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

There are currently no safe and effective approved medications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabinoid, with anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic properties shows promise To evaluate the feasibility and obtain preliminary evidence in support of a future fully powered efficacy trial of CBD, we carried out a phase 2a, single-site, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and BPSD (EudraCT Number – 2019-002106-52). To evaluate the feasibility and obtain preliminary evidence in support of a future fully powered efficacy trial of CBD, we carried out a phase 2a, single-site, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and BPSD (EudraCT Number – 2019-002106-52). Participants of either sex aged 55 years or older with possible or probable AD (McKhann et al., Reference McKhann, Drachman, Folstein, Katzman, Price and Stadlan1984) were eligible, if they had BPSD with total score on Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) (Cummings, Reference Cummings1997) ≥4 and at least 1 item with score of 2 or more (frequency × severity) on one of the domains of anxiety, agitation, hallucinations, or delusions.

Cannabinoid extract in microdoses ameliorates mnemonic and nonmnemonic Alzheimer’s disease symptoms: a case report

This report addresses the beneficial effect of cannabinoids in microdoses on improving memory and brain functions of a patient with mild-stage Alzheimer’s disease. The patient is a 75-year-old white man presenting with main symptoms of memory deficit, spatial and temporal disorientation, and limited daily activity. The experimental therapeutic intervention was carried out for 22 months with microdoses of a cannabis extract containing cannabinoids. Clinical evaluations using Mini-Mental State Examination and Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale were performed.

Marijuana Use May Be Associated with Reduced Prevalence of Prostate Cancer: A National Survey on Drug Use and Health Study from United States of America

Authors Turab Mohammed,, James Yu, Yong Qiao,Eric Mortensen, Helen Swede, Zhao Wu,Jingsong Zhang, Silvia Di Agostino Published May 12,  2024 DOI: 10.3390/biomedicines12051008 Citations Mohammed, T., Yu, J., Qiao, Y., Kim,…

The Use of Cannabinoids in Pediatric Palliative Care—A Retrospective Single-Center Analysis

This data analysis aimed to systematically analyze a pediatric patient population with a life-limiting disease who were administered cannabinoids. It was a retrospective single-center analysis of patients under supervision of the specialized outpatient pediatric palliative care (SOPPC) team at the Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU). Thirty-one patients with a primary diagnosis of neuropediatric, oncologic, metabolic, and cardiologic categories were included. The indications we identified were spasticity, pain, restlessness, anxiety, loss of appetite, epilepsy, and paresis. Certain aspects of quality of life were improved for 20 of 31 patients (64.5%). For nine patients (29%), no improvement was detected. No conclusions could be drawn for two patients (6.5%). Adverse events were reported for six of the thirty-one patients (19.4%). These were graded as mild, including symptoms such as restlessness, nausea, and behavioral issues. We detected no clinically relevant interactions with other medications. We collected fundamental data on the use of cannabinoids by pediatric palliative patients. Cannabinoids are now frequently administered in pediatric palliative care. They seem to be safe to use and should be considered an add-on therapy for other drug regimens.

Unveiling the Potential of Cannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and the Dawn of Nano-Cannabinoid Medicine

Multiple sclerosis is the predominant autoimmune disorder affecting the central nervous system in adolescents and adults. Specific treatments are categorized as disease-modifying, whereas others are symptomatic treatments to alleviate painful symptoms. Currently, no singular conventional therapy is universally effective for all patients across all stages of the illness. Nevertheless, cannabinoids exhibit significant promise in their capacity for neuroprotection, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppression. This review will examine the traditional treatment for multiple sclerosis, the increasing interest in using cannabis as a treatment method, its role in protecting the nervous system and regulating the immune system, commercially available therapeutic cannabinoids, and the emerging use of cannabis in nanomedicine. In conclusion, cannabinoids exhibit potential as a disease-modifying treatment rather than merely symptomatic relief. However, further research is necessary to unveil their role and establish the safety and advancements in nano-cannabinoid medicine, offering the potential for reduced toxicity and fewer adverse effects, thereby maximizing the benefits of cannabinoids.

Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol for Pain Treatment—An Update on the Evidence

In light of the current International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) guidelines, the topic of cannabinoids in relation to pain remains controversial, with insufficient research presently available. Cannabinoids are an attractive pain management option due to their synergistic effects when administered with opioids, thereby also limiting the extent of respiratory depression. On their own, however, cannabinoids have been shown to have the potential to relieve specific subtypes of chronic pain in adults, although controversies remain. Among these subtypes are neuropathic, musculoskeletal, cancer, and geriatric pain. Another interesting feature is their effectiveness in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Analgesic benefits are hypothesized to extend to HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as to lower back pain in the elderly. The aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review of the existing preclinical as well as clinical studies, along with relevant systematic reviews addressing the roles of various types of cannabinoids in neuropathic pain settings.

Cannabidiol and brain function: current knowledge and future perspectives

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally occurring non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in Cannabis sativa, commonly known as cannabis or hemp. Although currently available CBD products do not meet the safety standards of most food safety authorities to be approved as a dietary supplement or food additive, CBD has been gaining widespread attention in recent years due to its various potential health benefits. While primarily known for its therapeutic effects in managing epileptic seizures, psychosis, anxiety, (neuropathic) pain, and inflammation, CBD’s influence on brain function has also piqued the interest of researchers and individuals seeking to enhance cognitive performance. The primary objective of this review is to gather, synthesize, and consolidate scientifically proven evidence on the impact of CBD on brain function and its therapeutic significance in treating neurological and mental disorders. First, basic background information on CBD, including its biomolecular properties and mechanisms of action is presented. Next, evidence for CBD effects in the human brain is provided followed by a discussion on the potential implications of CBD as a neurotherapeutic agent.

Cannabis by any name does not smell as sweet: potential cardiovascular events with medical cannabis

Recently, attitudes towards cannabis and its use have changed dramatically and continue to evolve worldwide. In 2014, many states in the USA started legalizing cannabis, thus increasing the availability of medical and recreational cannabis and creating an entire cannabis industry with dispensaries on many street corners.1 Within most of the European Union (EU), cannabis remains illegal; however, recently many countries have begun to legalize cannabis for limited therapeutic purposes. Countries such as Germany, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Italy, and Poland now permit the cultivation of cannabis for medical purposes, with the cultivation and subsequent processing taking place under the usually strict rules applicable to agricultural, manufacturing, distribution, security, and clinical good practice.2 Close pharmacovigilance of cannabis, as well as its safety and efficacy, have been limited by decades of worldwide illegality and by the ongoing classification of cannabis as a Schedule 1 controlled substance in the USA. Nonetheless, with increased cannabis decriminalization and legalization across the globe, the association between cannabis exposure and incident cardiovascular (CV) events has emerged as an important safety signal.

Cannabis for chronic pain: cardiovascular safety in a nationwide Danish study

A rising number of countries allow physicians to treat chronic pain with medical cannabis. However, recreational cannabis use has been linked with cardiovascular side effects, necessitating investigations concerning the safety of prescribed medical cannabis. Using nationwide Danish registers, patients with chronic pain initiating first-time treatment with medical cannabis during 2018–21 were identified and matched 1:5 to corresponding control patients on age, sex, chronic pain diagnosis, and concomitant use of other pain medication. The absolute risks of first-time arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation/flutter, conduction disorders, paroxysmal tachycardias, and ventricular arrhythmias) and acute coronary syndrome were reported comparing medical cannabis use with no use.

Role of Cannabinoids in Oral Cancer

Cannabinoids have incited scientific interest in different conditions, including malignancy, due to increased exposure to cannabis. Furthermore, cannabinoids are increasingly used to alleviate cancer-related symptoms. This review paper aims to clarify the recent findings on the relationship between cannabinoids and oral cancer, focusing on the molecular mechanisms that could link cannabinoids with oral cancer pathogenesis. In addition, we provide an overview of the current and future perspectives on the management of oral cancer patients using cannabinoid compounds. Epidemiological data on cannabis use and oral cancer development are conflicting. However, in vitro studies assessing the effects of cannabinoids on oral cancer cells have unveiled promising anti-cancer features, including apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. Downregulation of various signaling pathways with anti-cancer effects has been identified in experimental models of oral cancer cells exposed to cannabinoids. Furthermore, in some countries, several synthetic or phytocannabinoids have been approved as medical adjuvants for the management of cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Cannabinoids may improve overall well-being by relieving anxiety, depression, pain, and nausea. In conclusion, the link between cannabinoid compounds and oral cancer is complex, and further research is necessary to elucidate the potential risks or their protective impact on oral cancer.

The Neurotherapeutic Arsenal in Cannabis sativa: Insights into Anti-Neuroinflammatory and Neuroprotective Activity and Potential Entourage Effects

Terpenes, aromatic compounds imbuing distinct flavours, not only contribute to cannabis’s sensory profile but also modulate cannabinoid effects through diverse molecular mechanisms. Flavonoids, another cannabis component, demonstrate anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective properties, particularly relevant to neuroinflammation. The entourage hypothesis posits that combined cannabinoid, terpene, and flavonoid action yields synergistic or additive effects, surpassing individual compound efficacy. Recognizing the nuanced interactions is crucial for unravelling cannabis’s complete therapeutic potential. Tailoring treatments based on the holistic composition of cannabis strains allows optimization of therapeutic outcomes while minimizing potential side effects. This review underscores the imperative to delve into the intricate roles of cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids, offering promising prospects for innovative therapeutic interventions and advocating continued research to unlock cannabis’s full therapeutic potential within the realm of natural plant-based medicine.